Skip to the FAQ section

 

Introduction to Wireless Technology

 

 

An Introduction to Free Space Optics (FSO) Technology

 

Free Space Optics (FSO)is a technology that uses laser beams via a line of sight optical bandwidth connection to transfer data, video or voice communications across areas ranging typically from 100m to a few kilometres at throughput bandwidths up to 1.25Gbps at frequencies above 300GHz of wavelengths, typically, 785 to 1550nm. Using Free Space Optics wireless networks eliminates the need to secure licensing found with RF signal solutions and also the expensive costs of laying fibre optic cable; principally the concept of transferring data via light is the same as with fibre optics just through a different medium.

The basis of Free Space Optics communication is rather straightforward with each unit housing an optical receiver and transmitter, allowing the sending and receiving of data simultaneously, and an optical source with a focusing lens. The unit at one location transmits a beam of focused light carrying the information directly at the unit at the receiving location where the light beam is then transferred to an optical fibre from a high sensitivity receiver.

Free Space Optics solutions offer various advantages of normal RF signal wireless networks such as:

  • Free Space Optics does not suffer from radio frequency interference or band over crowdedness.
  • High Bandwidth 1.25 Gbps
  • License free operation.
  • No software needed on client devices.
  • Very high security level operation.
  • Inside installation is possible and it unaffected by operation through glass.

Typical Free Space Optics Applications

Free Space Optics Wireless Networks can only operate as Point-to-Point links between 2 units, however, when combined with LAN or WLAN networks they can provide very effective solutions to many scenarios such as:

  • Provide a bridge between WLAN-to-WLAN connections on campuses at Fast Ethernet or Gigabit Ethernet speeds to cater for many subscribers simultaneously
  • Provide a bridge between LAN-to-LAN connections in a city between enterprise buildings that need to have reliable, high throughput networks
  • Create a wireless link across an area in which you do not have physical access to
  • Fast service delivery of high speed access to optical fibre, core networks
  • Service Provider backhaul to carry large amounts of data between the client network areas and the core network.
  • Converged Voice-Data-Connection
  • Temporary WLAN network set up and installation for events such as conferences
  • Quickly re-establish high-speed network connections after incidents (i.e. disaster recovery)
  • They can be installed as redundancy systems to provide fall back, fail safes for critical operations that require network access

Performance

Free Space Optics provides speeds comparable to those of optical fibre connections with the flexibility and practicality of being part of a wireless network providing bandwidth speeds typically advertised as up to 10Mbps, 100Mbps, 155Mbps and 1.25Gbps, with possible speeds of up to 10Gbps becoming likely in the future with the use of WDM (Wavelength-Division Multiplexing) technology. Currently, the only other wireless technology capable of these kinds of speeds is Millimetre Wave RF Wireless Networking which, in comparison, requires licensing and can affected severely by rain in the 60GHz range. Due to the received beam being transferred onto an optical fibre to connect to the core network, trouble free integration and easy set up make Free Space Optics networking's compatibility with any system very high.

Free Space Optics wireless network ranges are typically found to be between around 10m and 5km but due to the nature of the signal strength being directly affected more by atmospheric conditions over increasing distance, the shorter the range between the two unit locations the higher the performance and availability of the connection will be.

Free Space Optics can be equipped with various technologies to improve performance such as:

  • Auto Tracking, a pointing stabilisation technique, is where the actual units will automatically swivel upon their centre of axis under movement (i.e. building sway in high wind) to maintain the alignment with the other unit's location.
  • Multiple Beam Technologyhelps increase the beam intensity as they converge downstream by transmitting more than one light beam towards the receiver whilst also raising divergence slightly allowing more tolerance for misalignment issues.

Security

Free Space Optics is a very secure method of wireless communications when compared to RF Signal Networks because the light beams cannot be detected by spectrum analysers, data transmissions can be encrypted, the laser beams are very narrow and invisible making them hard to find or detect and to receive the signal, another matching receiver would have to be aligned within the light path which virtually impossible.

Technology

Maximum Data Rates

Typical Ranges

Security

Cost

Telco

Multiple Gbps

-

High

££££££

Free Space Optics

1.25Gbps

Up to 5km

Highest

££

70-80GHz RF Signal

1.25Gbps

Up to 10km

Very High

£££££

5.8GHz RF Signal

600Mbps

Up to 250m

Low

££

2.4GHz RF Signal

600Mbps

Up to 250m

Low

£

3G Mobile

28Mbps

Many km

Low

££

Technical Discussion & Difficulties

Line-of-Sight Obstructions

Due to light not be able to travel through opaque mediums, objects such as birds, planes and people can momentarily cause interruptions to the service by blocking the Free Space Optics' light beam, with service resuming instantly when the light path is cleared. Multi-beam technology can be used with compatible systems to try and counter this problem.

Unit Location Movement

Building sway due to wind can be a problem as it disrupts the alignment between the two transceiver units causing loss of signal. Divergent beam technology can be used to allow the units to communicate in these situations but performance is still slightly affected.

Safety

All Free Space Optics technology is strictly controlled to make sure that standards are followed to limit any dangers. On the whole, Free Space Optics units are of low enough power not to cause long term harm when the laser is exposed to a person's eye, however precautions should be taken so that this never occurs if possible.

 

An Introduction to 2.4GHz Technology

 

The most utilised Wireless Networking frequencies are those found in the unlicensed 2.4GHz band. Computer equipment that uses this band ranges from purpose built Point-to-Point Ethernet Bridging Kits to the small, Wi-Fi Dongles found on notebook laptops, however, many other types of products also operate within this frequency band such as Wireless Phones, Microwave Ovens, Video Devices and more which in turn can cause a lot of interference.

An example of WLAN in an office environment

 

  • The IEEE 802.11 standard governs the 2.4GHz band with the main ranges of wireless devices adhering to the following standards:
  • 802.11b- using DSSS, < 20Mbps per data stream and up to est. 140m
  • 802.11g- using OFDM, up to 54Mbps per data stream and up to est. 140m
  • 802.11n- using OFDM, up to 150Mbps per data stream and up to est. 250m

The 2.4GHz frequency band was the first to be brought into the Wireless Networking consumer mass market and therefore has become very popular in the home up to small enterprise level networking. Due to the technology being around for a good while, equipment has become competitively priced and extensively packed with features which is the reason why it has become so widely used.

For network coverage over larger distances, higher end, more expensive Access Points can be used with high gain antennas along with Point-to-Point Ethernet Bridges if distances between buildings are very high. These 2.4GHz Wireless Networks can span areas over many kilometres.

Typical Applications of 2.4GHz Technology

802.11 Wi-Ficonnections are used around the home and in offices to eliminate the use of cables when sharing printers, scanners, and high speed internet connections. In the home or small-office-home-office areas, devices such as Wi-Fi Routers and lower end Access Points can be used to create building wide internet and network access with small indoor antennas boosting the signal if needed. The main advantage of a 2.4GHz Wi-Fi WLAN is that they are simple to set up and require only one access point connected directly to the internet through the router. Once a machine is connected to that wireless network, it can access the web and other connected devices from anywhere within the router's range. More expensive Access Points are available that specialise in providing a larger range to cater for bigger buildings or outdoor environments.

Point-to-Point Ethernet Bridgesrefer to the implementation of Fixed Wireless Data links between just two computers or wireless networks at more distant locations where higher end, more expensive equipment can be used with high gain antennas. These 2.4GHz Wireless Networks can span areas over many kilometres. This is achieved, mostly, by using dedicated microwave signals over paths that have a clear Line-of-Sight and is often utilised in towns and cities to connect office buildings to a network without having to install an expensive cabled connection.

An example of point to point ethernet bridges

 

Performance

The 802.11 family, which governs the 2.4GHz frequency band, consists of a series of over-the-air modulation techniques that use the same basic protocol. The most popular are those defined by the 802.11b, 802.11g and 802.11n protocols. You can see in the table below the varying performance of the most popular standards:

2.4GHz 802.11 Wireless Networking Standards

802.11 Protocol

Release

Bandwidth (MHz)

Data rate per stream (Mbps)

Allowable MIMO streams

Modulation

Approximate indoor range (m)

Approximate outdoor range (m)

b

Sep-99

20

Up to 11

1

DSSS

38

140

g

Jun-03

20

Up to 54

1

DSSS, OFDM

38

140

n

Oct-09

20

Up to 72.2

4

OFDM

70

250

40

Up to 150

70

250

The Data Transfer Rates that are advertised are usually less when put in practice for several reasons, each data packet includes more data that what you are trying to transfer such as MAC, IP and TCP headers, checksum and preambles etc, also transmitters wait for a short interval between sending or receiving data packets to see if other networks are trying to use the same channel and finally, when each packet is received a small acknowledgement packet is sent to the location that it was sent from.

All of these have a slight effect on maximum throughput speed and therefore the suggested 'real' speeds of the standards could be said to be as follows (please note that throughput speed will vary for each individual wireless network set up so these figure should only be taken as a rough guide):

2.4GHz 802.11 Wireless Networking Standards

802.11 Protocol

Advertised Speed (Mbps)

Real World Throughput Speed (Mbps)

802.11b

11

≈ 4.5

802.11g (11b compatibility on)

54

≈ 14.5

802.11g

54

≈ 23

802.11g MIMO

108

≈ 45

802.11n

300

≈ 74

802.11n

600

≈ 144

Interference

2.4GHz Wireless Networks can suffer from bad interference causing signal loss and disruption to the network speed and reliability. This is due to many wireless consumer products using the 2.4GHz frequency band which has resulted in the relative air space to become "clogged up".

Video senders, devices for transmitting domestic video signals, are an especially big problem for 2.4GHz Wi-Fi networks. Unlike Wi-Fi they operate continuously, and are typically only 10 MHz in bandwidth. This causes a very intense signal as viewed on a spectrum analyser, and completely obliterates over half a channel. The result of this, typically in a WISP-type (Wireless Internet Service Provider) environment, is that clients can hear the Wi-Fi without any issues, but the receiver on the WISP's access point is completely obliterated by the video sender, so is extremely deaf. A combination of different factors such as, generally low power output of the Wi-Fi equipment in comparison, the fact that typically the video sender is far closer to the receiver than the Wi-Fi transmitter and the FM capture effect means that problems may be caused with respect to the Wi-Fi network over a wide area, but the Wi-Fi unit causes few problems to the video sender. Other products such as Phone networks including VoIP or DECT phones, Bluetooth signals, Car Alarms and Microwave Ovens (just to name a few) all operate on 2.4GHz frequencies and restrict channel availability which can cause problems. Also, 802.11n Wi-Fi networks are proving to be a slight source of interference for other wireless data networks operating at 2.4 GHz due to their increased MIMO (Multiple-In-Multiple-Out) capabilities and other factors.

With the emergence of the new, cost effect and high performing 5GHz products, the market dominance of the 2.4GHz frequency range is starting to look threatened and may well start to decline as users look to take advantage of the benefits of 5GHz Wireless Networking.

 

An Introduction to 5GHz Technology

 

5GHz Wireless Networkingis a quickly emerging technology that is becoming popular over the long existing 2.4GHz technology that we are all accustomed to. It uses the same concepts and methods as the 802.11g, 2.4GHz wireless standard but instead operates in 2 unlicensed and 1 licensed frequency bands within the 5GHz Wireless Networking range, also utilising OFDM technology throughout the whole speed scales rather than just above 20Mbps and MIMO (Multiple-In-Multiple-Out) technology. By using operating frequencies within the 5GHz Wireless Networking bands, you are provided with a range of significant advantages over equipment operating at 2.4GHz, a selection of these are as follows:

  • Unlike the 5GHz Wireless Networking band, the 2.4GHz band is so heavily used to the point of being over crowded, Signal Quality degradation caused by such conflicts can cause frequently dropped connections and unreliability of service. The greater amount of channels that are non-overlapping (4 to 8 times more) in the 5GHz Wireless Networking band provides more scope for the total number of wireless devices operating within close proximity without interference.
  • The 5GHz Wireless Networking band has higher output power limits on equipment and better NLOS (Non-Line-of-Site) Scatter capabilities increases the penetrative effect through buildings relative to 2.4GHz.
  • 5GHz Wireless Networking devices use OFDM over the entire speed range from 1Mbps upwards which greatly reduces the effect of NLOS, RF path signal interference that can occur indoors, slowing down your wireless network and causing it to become unreliable.
  • There is very minimal signal absorption by Water in the 5GHz Wireless Networking frequency bands which means the RF signal can penetrate wet objects a multitude of times greater than a 2.4GHz transmitter. Damp objects such as walls, high water content objects such as people and also rain can cripple 2.4GHz networks whereas 5GHz examples are almost not affected.

However, there are drawbacks to using this technology. The theoretical overall range of 5GHz is less than that of 2.4GHz when operating at the same output power as the Free Space Loss for the 5GHz frequency bands are calculated to be around 6dB poorer. This is due to the signals not being able to penetrate as far through walls and solid objects in their paths. The resulting range becomes only half as much and therefore higher power levels must be used if operating distances are to be made equal; this is ultimately not an issue as the regulated power levels of 5GHz equipment is much higher than that of 2.4GHz and so the problem is negated.

As a result, this is why 5GHz is quickly becoming popular and looks to be turning into the new standard when installing Near-Line-of-Site, Point-to-Point applications between buildings and also Wireless Networks within home and office spaces both small and large.

Typical Applications of 5GHz Technology

5GHz WLANconnections are used around the home and offices to eliminate the use of cables when sharing printers, scanners, and high speed internet connections. In the home or small-office-home-office areas, devices such as 5GHz Wi-Fi Routers and higher end, 5GHz Access Points can be used to create building wide internet and Wireless Network access with strong signal qualities with good interior ranges. The main advantage of a 5GHz WLAN is that they are simple to set up and require only one access point connected directly to the internet through the router. Once a machine is connected to that wireless network, it can access the web and other connected devices from anywhere within the router's range.

Point-to-Point Wireless Ethernet Bridgesrefer to the implementation of Fixed Wireless Data links between just two computers or networks at more distant locations where higher end, more expensive equipment can be used with high gain antennas. These wireless networks can span areas over long distances which are achieved by using dedicated 5GHz Wireless Networking signals over paths that can even be NLOS (Non-Line-of-Site) and are often utilised in towns and cities to connect office buildings to a network without having to install an expensive cabled connection. 5GHz Ethernet Bridges are especially popular in shorter Point-to-Point Links between two locations as they provide high throughput speeds, good reliability with relatively low chances of being degraded by signal interference.

Performance

The 802.11 family, which governs the 5GHz frequency band, consists of a series of over-the-air modulation techniques that use the same basic protocol. These are those defined by the 802.11a and 802.11n protocols.

You can see in the table below the varying performance of the 2 standards:

802.11 network standards

 

802.11 Protocol

Release

Bandwidth (MHz)

Data rate per stream (Mbps)

Allowable MIMO streams

Modulation

Approximate indoor range (m)

Approximate outdoor range (m)

 
 

a

Sep-99

20

Up to 54

1

OFDM

35

120

 

n

Oct-09

20

Up to 72.2

4

OFDM

70

250

 

40

Up to 150

70

250

 

The Data Transfer Rates that are advertised are usually slightly less when put in practice for several reasons, each data packet includes more data that what you are trying to transfer such as MAC, IP and TCP headers, checksum and preambles etc, also transmitters wait for a short interval between sending or receiving data packets to see if other networks are trying to use the same channel and finally, when each packet is received a small acknowledgement packet is sent to the location that it was sent from.

All of these have a slight effect on maximum throughput speed and therefore the suggested 'real' speeds of the standards could be said to be as follows (please note that throughput speed will vary for each individual wireless network set up so these figure should only be taken as a rough guide):

802.11 network standards

802.11 Protocol

Advertised Speed (Mbps)

Real World Throughput Speed (Mbps)

802.11a

54

≈ 27.5

802.11a MIMO

108

≈ 49

802.11n

300

≈ 74

802.11n

600

≈ 144

The UK has specific regulations as to the operating frequencies at which you can use your 5GHz Wireless Networking equipment. There are 3 bands called Band A, B and C which operate on the frequencies shown in the table below:

Band (A, B, C)

Frequency (GHz)

Channel

Maximum EIRP

License Regulations

A

(5.18GHz to 5.32GHz)

5.180

36

0.2W

License Free Operation

5.200

40

5.220

44

5.240

48

5.260

52

5.280

56

5.300

60

5.320

64

B

(5.5GHz to 5.7GHz)

5.500

100

1W

License Free Operation

5.520

104

5.540

108

5.560

112

5.580

116

5.600

120

5.620

124

5.640

128

5.660

132

5.680

136

5.700

140

C

(5.745GHz to 5.805GHz)

5.745

149

4W

License Required for Operation

5.765

153

5.785

157

5.805

161

Band A (5.150-5.350GHz)

All devices must comply with ERC Decision 99(23) and IR 2006 which includes TPC (Transmit Power Control) and DFS (Dynamic Frequency Selection), be part of a mobile/nomadic wireless network (i.e. WLAN applications), have a maximum EIRP of 0.2W (200mW) and must be for indoor use only.

Band B (5.470-5.725GHz)

All devices must comply with ERC Decision 99(23) and IR 2006 which includes TPC (Transmit Power Control) and DFS (Dynamic Frequency Selection), have a maximum EIRP of 1W with indoor and outdoor use being permitted. Please note that maximum power levels are much lower than those allowed in Band C.

Band C (5.725-5.850GHz)

All devices must comply with IR 2007, have a maximum EIRP of 4W with a PSD not exceeding 23dBm/MHz, have TPC (Transmit Power Control) and DFS (Dynamic Frequency Selection) and is only to be used in Fixed Service Operations applications (i.e. Point-to-Point links between 2 stationary locations).

Note:The frequency ranges and bands that are regulated in the UK are different to those found in the USA. Also, maximum output power of American equipment is 4 times less than that of the regulations in the UK. Therefore, for legality issues and optimum 5GHz Wireless Networking performance, it is critical that you do not purchase products intended for the US market for use within the UK.

Technical Discussion

OFDM

OFDM(Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) is a technology that can be used by your 5GHz Wireless Networking equipment to reduce loss in signal. The increased scatter property found with 5GHz Wireless Networking can cause problems with regards to signal quality due to an effect where signals that are being reflected off objects, such as walls, can be out of phase with each other. This can cause the overlapping waves in question to either enlarge the signal amplification or can completely cancel out each other. Also the times at which the reflected signals reach the receiver are different due to the varying distances in the RF Paths they have travelled to get there. The spread in the delay between the signals creates ISI (Intersymbol Interference) which is a situation in which the delayed signals begin to corrupt the symbols travelling on a shorter RF Path. OFDM can cure this by introducing 52 subcarrier channels within each 20MHz channel that send and receive date simultaneously in parallel with each other. The many, smaller channels ensure that more data can be transferred with lower levels of loss due to signal interference.

Scatter

Compared to 2.4GHz, 5GHz Wireless Networks have much better Non-Line-of-Site capabilities due to their increased Scatter performance resulting in the fact that they can be used in environments where there may be an amount of objects between the device locations. They do this by reflecting its signal off surrounding buildings to pass the obstructions in the direct line of site. Scatter performance is proportional to signal wavelength and due to the 5GHz Wireless Networking wave signals having smaller wavelengths than 2.4GHz waves, the Scatter performance is at least 19 times better.

Water

Water is a great absorber of 2.4GHz RF Signal, this is due to the chemical makeup of water between its Oxygen and Hydrogen bonds. Oppositely, 5GHz RF Signal is only very slightly absorbed by water. This means that 5GHz Wireless Networking devices can penetrate high water content objects such as damp walls, people and is also not affected as drastically in rainy conditions.

Fresnel Zones

Fresnel Zones are described as the circular cross sections between two wireless devices that must clear of any objects to avoid any degradation in signal quality. As the size of the Fresnel Zone is proportional to the wavelength of the signal, it is found that the larger the wavelength the bigger the Fresnel Zone (the area that must be clear). To avoid any complex calculations, the size of the 5GHz Fresnel Zone is about half that of 2.4GHz meaning that less free space is required between the two points. For more information, please refer to our "Fresnel Zones" article.

Free Space Loss & Output Power

 

These two go hand in hand when discussing 5GHz Wireless devices as Free Space Loss is the one area where they do not perform as well as 2.4GHz devices. As mentioned previously in this article, 5GHz Wireless Networking devices suffer around 6dB worse off which means the signal will only travel about half as far at the same output power of a 2.4GHz device (assuming antenna gain, receiver sensitivity etc. is the same) but this is counteracted by the regulations of the 5GHz Wireless Networking devices being able to operate at much high power levels. 2.4GHz equipment is limited to 0.1W (20dB) whereas 5GHz Band, C equipment can go all the way up to 4W (36dB)... 40 times more powerful. Even with the 6dB extra loss due to Free Space Loss, the potential extra range for 5GHz Wireless Networking devices can be up to 100% further.

In summary, 5GHz looks as though it will, in general, outperform 2.4GHz equipment in nearly all areas. In Point-to-Point, Non Line of Site applications 5GHz Wireless Networks seem to be much better suited, and with technology such as OFDM and high power levels, when equipped with a directional, high gain antenna, ranges of more than 10km can be achieved. When regarding interior applications, better scatter properties and high penetrative effect give great improvements for home, office and enterprise Networks.

The main drawback with 5GHz Wireless Networking as a solution is the increased price over 2.4GHz equipment. Nevertheless, as popularity rises and uptake increases the prices should become very competitive but even in the current market, 5GHz already seems to be a popular solution.

 

 


 

FAQ

 

What is the Operational Range of the Geodesy FSO?

The Geodesy FSO is an entire product line, not a single product, and the operational range is dependent on the model. Current available range is up to 5000m please refer to the product specifications sheet.

What is the Transmission Rate for the Geodesy FSO?
The transmission rate is specific to the model of the Geodesy FSO product. The Geodesy FSO unit can transmit Up to 1Gbs Full Duplex.

What is the Transmission Rate for the Geodesy FSO?
The transmission rate is specific to the model of the Geodesy FSO product. The Geodesy FSO unit can transmit Up to 1Gbs Full Duplex.

What are the Power Requirements for the Geodesy FSO
All Geodesy FSO Products are not POE compatible both at100Mbs and 1Gbs speeds, this can be either fibre or copper interface.

What are the Transmit/Receive Level Specifications for the Geodesy FSO Network Interface?
The Geodesy FSO network interface transmits at 785 nm class 1m laser.

What Kinds of Accessories does Geodesy FSO offer?
Geodesy's principal business is focused on sale of the Geodesy FSO product line. Some accessory products are available as part of a Geodesy FSO purchase. Brackets, power Supplies and sundries all included in package.

Will Alignment Telescopes be provided with all Orders?
Currently, alignment telescopes between 4x and 12x are shipped with every system.

What Impact does Vibration have on the Geodesy FSO
the Geodesy FSO has been designed such that vibration will have little or no effect on the system?

Will the Unit Survive a Lightning Strike?
The Geodesy FSO system has been designed to survive the electromagnetic transients induced by a nearby lightning strike.

Is There Any Way to Realign the Systems Automatically?
The Geodesy FSO products such as the Auto tracking have been designed automatically realign. Our Fixed beam systems Due to the combination of structural stability and beam width designed into the products, there should be little or no requirement for realignment, but his can be undertaken by a trained installer.

What is the Weight of the Geodesy FSO
The Geodesy FSO has been designed in a modular fashion so as to limit the weight of any individual component. For the Geodesy FSO Optical Heads weigh in at 6kg Up to 12Kg.

What is the Wind Load Factor? (How much Wind can the Geodesy FSO Withstand and Still Perform Properly?)
The Geodesy FSO is specified to maintain operational pointing stability at wind speeds up to 120 km/h (160 km/h survival).

Is the Mounting Mast Grounded?
The mounting mast may indeed be grounded, as is the Geodesy FSO itself. The Geodesy FSO terminal is earth grounded during installation. The Geodesy FSO is insulated from the mounting pole itself by the collar around the elevation control axle.

What Impact do Birds have on the Geodesy FSO
Birds are unlikely to have any impact on transmission, as a result of the spatial diversity between transmitters and the size of the receiver.

How often do the Systems Require Cleaning?
The Geodesy FSO has sufficient link margin such that periodic rain is more than enough to keep it clean in most installations.

How often do the Systems Require Realignment?
The Geodesy FSO has been designed sufficiently robust that realignment should not be required, unless the system has suffered a severe physical trauma

 

 

No RV/TP LED ont he local head, other side works perfect.

This LED displays that there is a connection from our local head to the remote side, and/or there is an active device connected to it.

We would suggest checking the following first:

  • On the remote end is there an active device connected to the laser head and does the active device link up with the laser head?

  • The remote end's local IP has to match with the local site remote IP and Vica versa.

  • If there was an IP change onto the laser heads we suggest a restart.

I forgot the password to the device how can I access the device?

In this cas we will need the serial number of the unit in question. Please send it to support@geodesy-fso.com and we will generate a new password. This password will let you login once to change the password.

I'm unsure what is the IP address of the device.

In this case connect your PC to the laser head and turn of all other active devices with IP address. Turn off the computers firewall and run a BROADCAST ping. (ping 192.168.100.255) in this case the first device will answer the laser head.

I can not ping across the laser head.

In this case, try to ping the other sides laser head, and if this answers the problem should be somewhere else.

After connecting the POE injector the laser head does not turn on.

The IEEE802.11af standards on several points are just giving guidance on the values of the POE devices. The Geodesy FSO POE devices were designed respecting these values in fact some PSU manufacturers don't, and due to these value definitions it is possible that the POE injector won't turn on the power. We would suggest using POWERDSIGN POE injectors.

Honlapkészítés, keresőoptimalizálás